Letter from the Editor

For some hospitalist employers, letting a recruit jump right into a new job seems like the best way to learn. Others have found, however, that taking the time to orient new hospitalist colleagues to their work environment reaps dividends down the line.


For some hospitalist employers, letting a recruit jump right into a new job seems like the best way to learn, while extensively training him or her seems like a waste of time and money. Others have found, however, that taking the time to orient new hospitalist colleagues to their work environment reaps dividends down the line. These physicians are better at documentation and coding, for example, and are more likely to stay with the group or hospital. Turn to our cover story to read about different types of training that hospitalist groups have instituted, and the benefits and challenges they've encountered as a result.

The POISE study, published in mid-2008, raised serious questions about the practice of prescribing beta-blockers before noncardiac surgery. While intervention group subjects had fewer heart attacks, they were more prone to stroke and hypotension. As a result, specialty groups issued updated guidelines in 2009 on beta-blockers before surgery, but questions still remain in the minds of many practicing hospitalists. Learn what experts currently think should be done, and what seems to be happening in routine practice.

Rude behavior has no role in the workplace, and that's especially true in a high-stakes environment like the hospital. Yet, as you'll read in our article, surveys show physicians treat their colleagues disrespectfully with surprising frequency. Learn how to recognize the sometimes subtle signs of a disruptive coworker, and what to do about it.

If there are other career or clinical topics you'd like us to cover, or if you have comments on the articles in this issue, please let us know. We'd love to hear from you.

Sincerely,
Jessica Berthold
Editor, ACP Hospitalist