Letter from the Editor

Hospital medicine is fairly well established in the U.S., Canada, and Europe, but in other countries the field is just getting started. These fledgling movements face familiar challenges, such as concerns about continuity of care, and unique obstacles, such as an income divide between physicians at public and private hospitals.


Hospital medicine is fairly well established in the U.S., Canada, and Europe, but in other countries the field is just getting started. In New South Wales, Australia, hospitals are moving away from their traditional “house officer” model, offering these physicians additional training in hospital medicine and a more autonomous role. Doctors in Brazil established the Brazilian Society of Hospital Medicine in 2008, while Chile's first known hospitalist service, consisting of three physicians, began practicing in 2005. Fledgling movements like these face familiar challenges, such as concerns about continuity of care, and unique obstacles, such as an income divide between physicians at public and private hospitals. For our cover story, Jessica Berthold talked to hospitalists around the world to get an in-depth look at how and where the field is expanding.

In May, ACP Hospitalist staff traveled to Chicago to cover the latest developments at Hospital Medicine 2009. Read why a leading cardiologist thinks hospitalists are best positioned to improve long-term outcomes in patients with aortic dissection, and which medical problems you're most likely to see in a pregnant patient. Other stories cover tips on improving handoffs and ways to optimize clinical documentation, along with a Web exclusive on how to recruit the best talent to join your team. Once you've read our coverage, let us know what you think.

Sincerely,
Jennifer Kearney-Strouse
Editor, ACP Hospitalist