Letter from the Editor

Glucose control in the ICU has become a moving target for hospitals and hospitalists alike. Our cover story looks at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American Diabetes Association’s new guidelines on glucose and how the new evidence may affect hospitalists’ practice.


Glucose control in the ICU has become a moving target for hospitals and hospitalists alike. In March, the NICE-SUGAR trial turned current practice on its head, showing that tight glucose control in the ICU hurt patients rather than helped them. The results led to a scramble to modify guidelines to add a bit more wiggle room in acceptable glucose levels, and caused many to speculate on how tight control became accepted practice so quickly in the first place. In our cover story, Stacey Butterfield looks at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American Diabetes Association's new guidelines on glucose and how the new evidence may affect hospitalists' practice.

In April, the ACP Hospitalist staff was on hand to cover the latest developments at Internal Medicine 2009, ACP's annual meeting, which offered over 260 sessions to more than 6,000 attendees. In our special coverage from Philadelphia, you'll find stories on managing pain in hospitalized patients, including tips on starting opioids; fighting hospital-acquired infection, including why one expert recommends against alcohol-based hand gels; dealing with delirium ; and learning why heparin may not always be the best choice for stroke .

Last month also saw the official launch of ACP Hospitalist ‘s blog, featuring live coverage from Hospital Medicine 2009 in Chicago. As always, you can reach us via email. Please let us know what you think.

Sincerely,
Jennifer Kearney-Strouse
Editor, ACP Hospitalist